The Catholic University of America

The Catholic University of America

Washington Past and Present: An Introductory Study

WASH 101- Spring 2016   

 

SECTIONS MEET:   Either Tuesdays, 11:10-12:00, Wednesdays, 12:40-1:30, or Thursdays, 12:40-1:30.  Discussion sections meet separately with assigned instructor in specified classroom.

ENTIRE CLASS MEETS: Fridays 12:40-2:30 PM, in Hannan 106.

Instructors:

·         Laura Daughtery (Th. section):  NCSSS, 110 Shahan, daughtery@cua.edu, x5782

·         Matthew Green (Wed. section): Politics, 315 Marist, greenm@cua.edu, x5667

·         Maria Mazzenga (Tues. section): History, 245 Marist, mazzenga@cua.edu, x5484

·         Atlas Xu (Teaching Assistant):  History, 67xu@cua.edu

Course Description:  

In this interdisciplinary course, students will learn about the past and present of Washington, D.C. and how the city illustrates a variety of theories and principles from different academic disciplines, including anthropology, art and architecture, economics, history, literature, media studies, political science, social work, and sociology. 

Students will examine Washington as a symbolic city (the design and meaning of its buildings, monuments, and museums), a political city (the behavior of national and local policy-makers, diplomats, and other political actors in Washington), and a living city (the city’s economy, neighborhoods, culture, and population).  In addition, the course emphasizes the importance of students learning how to ask probing questions about their environment, gather and analyze data to answer them, and effectively communicate their answers.

Methods:

Lectures, guest lectures, discussions, and excursions to the city.  Students must be willing to ride the Metro for periodic city excursions and must pay for their own Metro tickets.

Required Readings:

·         Green, Matthew N., Julie Yarwood, Laura Daughtery, and Maria Mazzenga, Washington 101:  An Introduction to the Nation’s Capital (Palgrave 2014) (available in CUA bookstore)

·         Any additional required readings, websites, or videos will be available on Library E-reserves and/or Blackboard.


Course Goals:

·         Learn how to think critically, gather and analyze data and information, construct interpretations and arguments, and present or communicate ideas effectively.

·         Learn to appreciate how different disciplines employ various methods to answer questions.

·         Learn to think intelligently about community.

 

Goals for Student Learning:

·         Learn about the history, politics, and social and economic life of Washington.

·         Learn about the relationship between the national and the local.

·         Understand the development of cities, the modern city, and in particular how neighborhoods are created and change.

 

Requirements and Grading:

·         Two papers (3-5 pages in length each), worth 30% of the grade (15% each).

·         Three short on-line quizzes, worth 15% of the grade (5% each).

·         Final exam, worth 30% of the grade.

·         Additional short homework assignments, worth 10% of the grade.

·         Class attendance and participation, worth 15% of the grade.

 

Academic Honesty:

As members of the community of scholars at The Catholic University of America, students are expected to act in accordance with the “Academic Graduate and Undergraduate Student Academic Dishonesty.”  The sanction for academic dishonesty is usually, but not necessarily limited to, failure for the course.  The university’s academic honesty policy is laid out in full here: http://policies.cua.edu/academicundergrad//integrityfull.cfm.

Accommodations:

Students with physical, learning or other disabilities wishing to request accommodations must identity with the Disability Support Services office and submit documentation of a disability to the instructor. It is the responsibility of the student to begin the process. More information can be obtained from the Disability Support Services website at http://dss.cua.edu/ .

Writing Center:

Students seeking assistance with their writing are strongly encouraged to visit the University’s Writing Center, located in 213 Pryz.  Appointments can be made at http://english.cua.edu/wc.  (NOTE:  Because the Center tends to be busy during midterms and during finals week, appointments to visit at those times are especially recommended.)


CLASS/READING SCHEDULE

Note: The schedule indicates the reading(s) that need to have been completed for that day’s class. Unless noted, all readings apart from the course text can be found on the course Blackboard site.

 

I. INTRODUCTION

Week 1: Catholic University

T/W/Th

1/12, 1/13, 1/14

Review these two websites:

   * http://www.cua.edu/about-cua/history-of-CUA.cfm

   * http://www.cua.edu/map/

Friday

1/15

Excursion:  campus tour with faculty

 

Week 2: History of the City of Washington

T/W/Th

1/19,

1/20,

1/21

* Berg, Grand Avenues, 77-81, 100-112

* Trollope, “The Domestic Manners of the Americans” (excerpt)

Friday

1/22

Guest Speakers: Doxie McCoy and Robert Barbuto, long-time Washingtonians

 

II. THE SYMBOLIC CITY

Week 3: Symbolism and Architecture

T/W

1/26, 1/27

NO CLASS THURSDAY (UNIVERSITY MASS)

* Green et al., chapter 1

Friday

1/29

Excursion: in individual sections

 

Week 4: Memorials and Monuments

T/W/Th

2/2, 2/3, 2/4

* Green et al., chapter 2

Friday

2/5

Guest Speakers: Vietnam Veterans; Thomas Striegel, Architect

 

** Quiz #1 Posted **

 

Week 5: Memory and Politics on the Mall

T/W/Th

2/9, 2/10, 2/11

* Green et al., chapter 3

Paper #1 assigned

Friday

2/12

Guest Speakers: Michael Neufeld, National Air and Space Museum; John Franklin, National Museum of African American History and Culture


III. THE POLITICAL CITY

Week 6: Protest and Politics

T/W/Th

2/16, 2/17, 2/18

* Green et al, chapter 5

 

Friday

2/19

Guest Speakers: Representative, Youth Rally & Mass for Life;  John Dillon, United States Park Police

Paper #1 DUE

 

Week 7: The Washington Political Community

W/Th

2/24, 2/25

NO CLASS TUESDAY (ADMIN. MONDAY)

* Green et al., chapter 4

Friday

2/26

Guest Speakers: Jessica Towhey, former congressional and campaign aide; Zach Dupont, Office of Rep. Richard Neal; Drake Starling, World Bank

 

Week 8: SPRING RECESS:  NO CLASS (SPRING BREAK)

 

Week 9: National Politics

T/W/Th

3/8, 3/9, 3/10

* Re-read Green et al., chapter 4

Friday

    3/11

Excursion: self-guided assignment

 

** Quiz #2 Posted **

 

Week 10: The International City

T/W/Th

3/15, 3/16, 3/17

* Green et al., chapter 6

Friday

3/18

Excursion in individual sections

 

 

Week 11:  Local Politics

T/W

3/22, 3/23

NO CLASS THURSDAY (EASTER RECESS)

 

3/25

NO CLASS (EASTER RECESS)


Week 12: Local Politics (cont.)

T/W/Th

3/29, 3/30, 3/31

* Green et al., chapter 7

Paper #2 Assigned

Friday

4/1

Guest Speakers: TBA

 

Week 13:  Local Economics

T/W/Th

4/5, 4/6, 4/7

* Green et al., chapter 9

Paper #2 Due

Friday

4/8

Guest Speakers: James C. Dinegar, President and CEO, Greater Washington Board of Trade (tentative); Linda Donaldson, National Catholic School of Social Service

 

IV. THE LIVING CITY

Week 14: Demographics

T/W/Th

4/12, 4/13, 4/14

* Green et al., chapter 8

Friday

4/15

NO CLASS (RESEARCH DAY)

 

** Quiz #3 Posted **

 

Week 15: Neighborhoods I

T/W/Th

4/19, 4/20

 4/21

* Green et al., chapter 10

Friday

4/22

Guest Speaker: John Feeley

Excursion: Brookland Walking Tour

 

Week 16: Neighborhoods II

T/Th

4/26, 4/27, 4/28

NO CLASS WEDNESDAY (READING DAY)

Readings will be assigned for each section by instructors

Friday

4/29

Excursion: in individual sections

 

FINAL EXAM:

Friday        

5/6

Final Exam: 10:15am – 12:15pm